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done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
years is a direct result of economic insecurity now. it has led, for spm, to education cuts that have harmed children in low-income school districts. reversing those decisions can still have an enormous impact." but under president obama, america's spending more money on education than any other nation in the world. also, taxes have been going up. and we have record debt. but the left wants more spending and even higher taxes. simply put, the big government spending machine has not helped the economy very much. but again, liberal theory trumps results. >> the idea that so many children are born into poverty in the wealthiest nation on earth is heartbreaking enough, but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. >> well, it certainly offends me. if children are not getting a good education or do not have proper health care, i'm offended. but you cannot bankrupt the entire nation on some ideological quest for income equality. in a capit
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
is education. you have more people going to college than ever before, which means more debt, but that doesn't necessarily mean better paying jobs. we're talking about $15 to $20 an hour. do you think raising the minimum wage would have an impact on the way we at least think about education? would more people be less likely to want to go to school if they're getting paid more without having to go? >> i don't think the minimum wage has much of an impact on educational decision. i do think that college is still a good deal, but the reality is that inequality is growing even amongst those who actually go to college. the median college salary is not really keeping pace with the rest of the economy. so again, i think when thinking about the overall picture about inequality, we do need a number of different tools. i think the minimum wage plays one part of that but an important one. >> one of the arguments that corporations like mcdonald's and wendy's in particular like to make is, well, if we raise wages, then we're going to have to raise prices, and you guys don't want that and they throw out th
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
not only had an incredibly active career, but some of the u.s. concentrated on higher education and educating himself. he is a man with three graduate degrees, including one from the u.s. naval war college, and i should add that we were proud to present him with an honorary degree here just a couple of years ago. i should not neglect to say, general flynn has been given many awards, including the defense superior service medal with three oakley's clusters, the legion of merit with an of leaf cluster, the brand star, the meritorious service medal and others that are not too numerous to mention. he is a great friend of this school, and we are honored that you could join us and the floor is yours. >> thank you. [applause] >> great. first, before i get into some formal remarks, i hopefully -- everyone got handed out one of these. it is that there are your see your you got it when you walked in. a pamphlet about the defense intelligence agency and other about who we are all we're doing a behalf of national security for this country. it will give you some idea about the direction of o
. we used to call each other and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform, on getting things done. we loved the environment in which you could actually achieve results. that's the great thing about being a governor. and i look at so many members of the utah state legislature who are here, and with each one of the i can tell you stories about how we able to get things done and there can do attitude. just remarkable. joe then went on to the senate and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on capitol hill, something that evan knows a lot about. i went on to china to become our senior diplomat running the embassy there, and we kind of regrouped a little bit when joe and nancy jacobson who really was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to become a part of this movement? and i thought what on earth is new labels? is a third party effort to try to shipwreck the republicans and the democrats? is it a bunch of mushy moderates trying to get together to take over the world? none of the above. come to find out that it is a group that respects t
we could save or have people contribute to our kids' college education, as well as teaching our kids how to donate to things that are meaningful to them and that is how triple the gift was born. >> so how does it work? it sounds like a gift registry or wedding registry. >> right. you personalize it, a person can put the child's name, event, joey's christmas registry, and a special message for family and friends to see. they invite family and friends to see it through e-mails, with a link or can directly e-mail from the website that we set up a registry. >> do you list what you want for the child as well as gifts or amounts of money if i donations? how does that work? >> you can definitely put in there any sort of message. if that child is saving for a special technological gift or whatever. when parents set up the registry, they designate how much for the gift card, how much for college savings and how much for the charity of their choice. >> so is there a service fee or charge to set up the registry? >> there is no service fee to view it. there is a charge for when someone contribut
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
experience or they will exchange out for education, for a couple of the years. a lot of people coming out of college may have part-time jobs elsewhere or going through a difficult economic time with the job market that it has recently been, how do we have the ability to get that experience? a lot of young people are looking for jobs to be able to get that experience and learn obvious job training that maybe they are not getting through their college career. what is your college background and are you still paying off college loans? caller: i am. i just finished my masters degree. i am currently employed at i has been in the job market, i have been in the professionals setting since i was 16 years old. i spent a lot of time building that experience, maybe not making as much as other people. if i am thankful i have had that ability to get that experience. i am finding a lot of young people participate in clubs and organizations, whether or not they are getting paid or getting whatever they can to get a tiny bit of experience on their resume. aret of companies out there looking for 5, 10, 10
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
. a fascinating character. to many jews, highly educated, and using. from newport rhode island, and fantastic american was from a very good ones family who went to yale, ph.d. at harvard. the aged 27 he was given charge of the survey of all the lands between sacramento and the west of cheyenne. a hundred miles to the north and south, the 40th parallel survey. to consider years. the books and maps. could cost hundreds of thousand dollars. beautifully, beautifully accomplished. and he had all sorts of amazing adventures while doing the survey, but as a reward for doing so well he was appointed to be the first-ever director of the newly established body count the united states geological survey which, of course, today the country in its entirety. the move to new york, the headquarters of the usgs and he was the first director. the second was john wesley powell. his personal life is what i want to mention briefly. i was astonished when i stumbled across it. help no one will hold this against and, but he was a sexually energetic in man, but he did not like white women. he loved native american wom
the decision yesterday. but we're going to continue to educate the community in detroit and across michigan and across this country. you don't attack workers who have given their lives to public service at the expense of their pensions. i mean they earned their pensions. as you heard the gentleman say, those pensions were earned by them when they were working and they deserve to retire with dignity and respect. >> and you can't listen to those stories, and i heard a lot of them, i read a lot of them today, they're understandably panicked. they don't know if they're facing a 5% cut, a 50% cut, but here's the argument on the other side. for example, vallejo, california, tried to get back on track without touching pensions and couldn't do it. in some cases cities have had to reduce services, things like police in order to pay retirees. so the question is can these cities which are in so much trouble, can they get out of the hole and still protect pensions? >> well, look, nobody is saying that urban areas and cities across the country are not experiencing fiscal difficulty, they are. but we've
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
in the air about all of this. i take this from an educational point of view. our people to on see who was being subversive to our government, who was working with foreign interests. this is nothing new. unfortunately the nsa, as much as we hate it and it leaves a to taste, they have a job do. when you take a look at multimedia, like facebook, twitter, so on and so forth, you have people constantly pushing one side or the other and if they are following these little groups online and nobody knows who these groups are. now that facebook is a public , who is spending the money to antagonize people to take extreme size of -- extreme --es of republican, democrat if you take a look at what is out there, it is extremely hateful, extremely pointed, and a violent tone. why are people having such a the time understanding that government has a job to protect its people? if you are going to put something stupid out there you are responsible for your actions. host: will any of these surveillance disclosures changed the way you use social media like facebook? caller: no. the bottom line is if i am
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> we're back with debby wasserman schultz and reince priebus. >> i want to set the stage. in a recent poll, 80% of the country distrusts washington and does not think washington makes the right decision on a regular basis. the country is clearly going to want to change. you are likely to nominate somebody who first became active in 1972 as a mcgovern field person who then became a national figure in 1992, which means that if you are under 42 years of age, you couldn't vote when her husband first ran. do you really think hillary clinton is the face of change the country will want to vote for in 2016? >> there's a reason that my counter part a few minutes ago said their party as a problem winning presidential elections. they are dramatically out of touch with most americans in the country. it is because even though he had a rebrand, it hasn't worked out so well. because just yesterday you could look at the things that the organizations did to alienate us african-americans, hispanics, i mean, jews an
, health and human services, education committee irs some of the social security and small business administrations, as well as a number of other federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. veterans are counting on us to solve these challenges. operates at, v.a. large health care -- integrated health care systems, may be one of the larger ones in the country, on hundred 51 medical centers, 871 clinics, 300 vet centers, and i know there are 70 mobile outreach clicks that reach out into the most rural areas defined veterans who live remotely. over 1700 remote access points nationwide. beyond health care, v.a. revised $10 billion in education assistance annually, second only to the department of education. v.a. guarantees nearly 1.8 million home loans, the only zero-down into the inner nation, and our foreclosure rate is lowest among all categories of mortgage loans. as the ninth largest life insurance and price, with 6.7 million clients and 95% customer saxes faction -- satisfaction rating. to the support of the congress and the leadership of the president and the invites an
more pre-k education, employment, raising minimum wage, all things i think people want but where does the money come from, how do they build a coalition. andrea, in congress in the last couple years, coalitions for anything are extremely hard to build. >> the other thing that really caught my attention today was john boehner addressing mike allen's report in "politico" about how republicans are trying to teach their respective members and senate candidates how to appeal to women voters. don't talk about, quote, legitimate rape. this is boehner talking about the coaching practices. >> trying to get them to be a little more sensitive. you know, you look around the congress, there are a lot more females in the democratic caucus than republican caucus. some of our members just aren't as sensitive as they ought to be. >> do you think they are making progress on that front? >> i do. >> they only have 8% of republican caucus. by 3-1 democrats have more women than republicans in congress. just the optics aren't great and some of their senate candidates have been disastrous. >> obviously we kn
helped educate individuals about the importance of gna -- dna and the genome. at the same time, it is not entirely clear, what information is useful to patients in being cared for by a physician or a pharmacist or another have their professional -- health care professional. us bashitute takes takes this very seriously. there are legal and social implications of these genomic advances. we are supporting these genomic studies. we realize that there are many issues that need to be considered if we are going to use genomics as part of routine medical care. host: we have one question left. good morning and thank you for your research. is your research leading to be able to predict when genetics -- genetic procedures will hit? -- diseases will hit? sometimes a disease will skip a generation or so. resource -- research leading to any way of predicting? that is a great question. i tried to manage expectations. right now we can weed out people and make some predictions about certain diseases that they make at -- might get. in some cases, we can say with certainty. in most cases, it is m
education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a historic downturn, the case for nih support is so strong, support for nih is so strong across parties and hous
year. 20 young children and six educators were murdered that day on december 14th, 2012. this saturday, marks a year since that horrific event. as you can see the news conference is beginning. we'll monitor what the officials have to say and bring you any headlines moments from now. today's top headlines and brand new stories you will sear here first. jon: the obamacare website gets a makeover. new options are able if you're shopping. with deadline looming do the updates matter? >>> wild weekend weather across the u.s. and more is on the way. meteorologist maria molina on where people should be preparing now. >>> silicon valley versus washington. the nation's top tech companies teaming up to send a message to uncle sam. ease up on all snooping. it is all "happening now." jon: well the obamacare website getting a face-lift but ongoing problems with the federal exchange may be more than skin deep. i hope you had a good weekend. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: does obamacare cover facelifts? is that a question we're leading with today. jon: let's hope not. >> hi, everybody. i'm
out of this government. there is not enough education for them and the jobs aren't plentiful enough, the pay is not plentiful, the housing is substandard. they feel they have not made any progress and in many cases they have stopped hoping for it. they said we need another government. there is a lot of pride in nelson mandela but there remains mostly because of economics a lot of advertis dissatisfaction. in his time or in his memory he hasn't been able to bridge the economic gap. tony. >> ali velshi. thank you. jonathan betz is here. jonathan. >> it is going to be a who's who of royals, celebrities, a leader of every major country will be in south africa, 100 have rscped so far. the queen of gland can't make it but david cameron can. mandela also close with cuba so its president, rool castro, -- raul castro will be there. hassan rouhani is coming. put not israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. he is concerned about the high security cost. >>> the dalai lama will be there. ful of johannesburg wip be shut down. an entire airport will be set aside for just the vips. security will
are the jobs? >> unemployment for college-educated workers is below 4%. so when you look at that 7% number, it represents a lot of people who have not gotten their high school education or maybe just have a high school education. if you have a college degree, we're seeing job growth in professional and business services, certainly in engineering which continues to be kind of a real driver of jobs, health care is net hire job creator over the last several years and hires nurses and other technicians. there are good jobs being created. when you look at this total number, say, 200,000-plus this month, certainly a good percentage of them were in the lower wage category. but then we want -- those people who are out of work having the hardest time, need those jobs, too. >> we saw the fight over raising the minimum wage heat up this week. you wrote an interesting piece about the rise of income inequality. what would raising the minimum wage do in this country to close the income gap? do we even know? >> first of all, i'm all in favor of having this discussion about wages and equality. the minimum
required that all patent applications be reviewed by patent examiners when a scientific education. people who understand the technology that the patent covers. this helps to ensure that patents are not issued for inventions that are already in the public domain. or that would be obvious to a person who is skilled in the technology. under the gentleman from california's amendment, however, an applicant could short circuit the entire patent examination's process and present his evidence of patentibility for the first time in district court. now, i have known many district judges who are excellent lawyers, but very few of them have degrees in biotechnology. very few have degrees in electrical engineering. yet under this amendment these judges would be making the initial determination whether, for example, a purported computer invention is novel and nonobvious, and whether it has been properly enabled. i would ask my colleagues, is there anyone here who believes that the united states will issue higher quality patents if the applications are never, never, never reviewed by an examiner with a
to make you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. what a day. what a day this was! we got an employment number that had something for everyone. and it catapulted the averages higher. dow gaining 199 points. s&p falling 1.12% and the nasdaq climbing. stocks had been going down. for five days and the expectation that interest rates had to rise, because there would be such a huge burst of hiring. investors had been selling down their holding, they thought growth was too robust. instead we got a cinderella payroll employment number this morning that gave people a reason to stop selling bonds and to start -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> -- stocks, which had been dropping all week. it's a pretty amazing thing to watch. the same stocks that have been hammered going into the jobs report spring back to life. the banks, industrials, housing-related names, the consumer product stocks. almost as if they were all priced to a huge bond selloff which would've driven rates up, and when they didn't happen, we put the labor report under the cate
with the public is an honor, end quote. and burkle plans to take the medal on an educational tour along with the faulkner nobel prize for literature which he also owns. that's going to do it for me. i'm fredericka whitfield. much more straight ahead with deb feyerick in new york. a very inspirational -- it was heartfelt that this item was being put up for auction at least according to jesse owens' daughter and then hearing that, it seems as though the penguins' owner is greatly appreciative of the history that comes with that medal and so maybe that kind of -- i guess, puts the family at ease to a degree. >> he'll keep it in the right historical context and treat it with respect that it definitely deserve. great interview, by the way, fredericka. thanks so much. >> have a great evening. see you in a bit. >>> you are in the cnn "newsroom." i'm deborah feyerick opinion does anybody remember summertime? i certainly don't. it seems like a lifetime ago. >> got a big chunk of the country to show you today. people in several states were dealing with a one-two punch of ice and extremely bitter
made up of older professionals, working married couples, and educated singles usually make at least six figures a year during other periods which is in the top 20% of earners. frank and michelle? >> okay, wendy. well the world will have a new biggest airline today, right? >> it's going to be in the u.s.. american airlines will merge with u.s. airways when their deal goes through later today. the government had tried to block the merger. the deal will lift american airlines out of bankruptcy protection. >> okay, wendy, live in new york, thank you. >>> well morning commuters are facing an icy ride across the mid atlantic this morning. more on the impact of the blast of winter weather. >>> researchers have found an easy way to kill bed bugs. how to deal with the blood sucking pests. ,,,,,,,,,, avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive" sales event is back. which means it's never been easier to get a new 2014 jetta. it gets an impressive 34 highway mpg and comes with no charge scheduled maintenance. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. sign. then drive. get z
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. when you do what i do, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >> up next steve rattner will be here and former governor ed rendell joins the conversation. "morning joe" is
, i think we suspend a lot of time talking about the weaknesses and failures of our education system. clearly we're in a crisis moment. what i felt wasn't taking place in our pub leg conversation as much as what we're doing right and where there are success stories and there are wonderful success stories all over the country. so the aim and the purpose of the book was really to invite leaders into the class roovps of teachers doing incredible work that are achieving in spite of systemic issues and problems and that are really finding innovative and unique solutions to you beubiquetous problems. >> they all stand out, obviously. >> jason chung is a teacher in philadelphia who is in his fourth year of teaching and he entered the profession. that was his first job and he was told that he would have $100 for his entire annual budget to teach at seven different schools percussion. and his solution was not to climb into bed, pull the covers over his head and not come out. his solution was to go to home depot and boy paint buckets, which he then taught his students to drum only. so he's cre
's energy or education i think the db should be whether these programs or departments should even exist at all and you would just take the contribution corruption out of it. >> i think that is a great point. we need to have a more fundamental debate and i do think that one of the problems i talked about italk about in "exs that those republicans and democrats in the house have a system of so-called party do and they make it sound like a country club think what you've got to pay your dues in the country club. this is like a country club that you may not be interested in joining but you are going to join is basically how it works. you come into congress and you are given essentially a priceless and we print piece in the appendix in the back of the book so for example if you want to sit on the house financial services committee come in addition to your own campaign fund raising, you have to raise in that cycle have a million dollars to go to the party committee. if you sit on that committee and you don't raise that money and you consistently don't make that mark, they will threaten and tak
policy. i think this is a lot of politics and believe me, i educate people on both sides of the aisle. i've been saving eagles for over 30 years. it took us over 30 years to bring the eagle back from the brink of extinction, a lot of work by hundreds of conservation groups and thousands of individuals across the country that put their heart and soul. and to do this, to give power companies a 30-year hunting license essentially to kill eagles and other birds is -- i think we're opening a pandora's box that will kill millions of birds over the next 30 years. tens of millions maybe, over the next 30 years and i don't understand why we're making this compromise. >> yeah. we've got a graphic to put up that shows the number of eagle deaths from wind turbines. the state of wyoming has recorded the most deaths. the whole problem is folks say, if you got these great big wind turbines, they kill a lot of birds and invariably, there are eagles there as well. what do you want them to do, al? >> well, i think first off, the 30-year permit thing ought to be nixed right now. we've already got five-year
.t. in businesses in health care and in education, real need for innovation in software and data centers and being able to make use of all this information. and have it create better outcomes for patients, for students, to solve all the challenges that are out there. so we have been building really change the company quite dramatically in the last five years. in building a whole new set of capabilities and we'll invest in those further as a private company, without an obsession on short-term results. [ female announcer ] for those who love sweets your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine for challenge butter. and when hands get messy quite surely they'll say yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life. ♪ ♪ >>> 'tis the season to bust a few moves, after lighting the national christmas tree. president obama joins some perf
the style of hairstyle they want, our hair stylists work with little girls to educate them on how they can take care of their dolls hairs. stuart: is this your dream to come here and get american girl doll? >> yeah. stuart: good for you. stuart: what is your name? >> samantha. stuart: samantha. did your doll eat with you today? and what is your doll's name? >> samantha. [laughter] stuart: as you walk around this place, you are surrounded by little girls seven, eight, nine years old and they are clearly in the place they want to be. five weeks until christmas, less than that, it is a big deal. and this is a terrific place to be. when i went to get the next on? >> next year. >> good answer. stuart: that was a lot of fun. i have some hard numbers for you. 143 million american doll books have been sold, 23 million american girl dolls sold, and 54 million visitors to the 17 stores. 70 million visitors per year to american girl.com. mattel is the parent company, that is important. let's bring in nicole and charles on this one. first of all, american girl, is that a big part of their operation?
certainly is are -- in the broader use of i.t. and businesses and health care and education, real need for innovation and software and data centers and being able to make use of all this information and have it create better outcomes for patients for students to solve all the challenges that are out there. and so we have been building really changed the company quite dramatic will i in the last five years and building a whole new set of capabilities, and we'll invest in those further as a private company without an on session, short-term results with focus on the long term. >> i want to go back to charlie's point about the bruising battle for a second. it did get a little nasty with carl icahn. i wonder how you feel about him. next time are you going to invite him out to lunch, say i like your shoes, or this is how it goes. >> i don't think i'll be -- >> or like your tie. you know what i mean. >> let's go to dinner. >> come over to my house for christmas. >> you know what i mean. it got a little heated between the two of you. >> you know, this is the largest c
on the roads the rest of us paid for. you hired workers the rest of us paid to educate. you were safe if your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of us paid for. you didn't have to worry that maraud bands would come and seize everything at your factory and hire someone to protect this because of the work the rest of us did. you built a factory, it built into something or a great idea. god bless, keep a big hunk of it. but part of the underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward for the next kid who comes along. >> that harvard law professor won her senate rait race for the senate. she is now senator elizabeth warren. not only that, her populist message defined the election as a whole. >> if you are successful somebody along the line gave you some help. there was a great teacher somewhere in your life. somebody helped to create this unbelievable american system that we have that allowed you to thrive. somebody invested in roads and bridges. if you got a business, you didn't build that. somebody else made that happen. the internet didn't get i
are going to have to get up and understand this program. it is going to take a while for the educational process to work. we will put a small fine on this year of a few dollars. $95. guest: the next year, the fine goes up. and the next year. there will be increasing pressure to get everybody in. the reason is very simple. to need healthg care at some time or other for something. the idea that i can wait until i am sick and then i will jump in, that means you're a free rider. if you are in an automobile accident, who pays for it? host: was it shortsighted to have a small penalty the first year given the problems we have seen? what if people do not sign up because they sated paoli is $95, i will pay that -- because they say the penalty is $95, i will pay that? guest: that is a political decision. should have been $5,000 or five dollars. we picked 95. if it was $200, more people would want to get in. you would have had the initial bill coming out with a $500 fine if you don't sign up. jumping up in the air about that. was it the right number, i don't know? host: how did you -- did you come
and others about the application of the rule as a part of trying to educate all of the people that are affected and we have brought medicare advantage expert into those to help answer those questions. >> just to follow up on that, medpac looked at as a couple years ago about an observation, and because of the increase in observation, which they had found committee also looked at whether the recovery audit contractors, medicare recovery audit contractors scrutiny seemed to be driving this allowed. and they looked at a broader segment, both medicare and private observation stays. and they found that there was an increase in observation across the board him and not just from the medicare and they surmised that there were private payers also scrutinizing short stays in the same way that medicare was and that that might be driving it. we just note that in the report i think we did look at whether or not i'm the message we lookt medicare beneficiaries both able and disabled we looked at whether the increase in utilization was different for people over 65 and under 65, and admittedl
of the last four months. in november, many were good paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care. 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we are getting consistent job reports plus 200 and that is positive and positive not only for the economy but it should be forpositive for people should start to feel generally better that conditions are, in fact, improving. >> reporter: on closer look, the unemployment rate for adult men at 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but the numbers are higher for african-americans and teenagers but they -- >> it's quite clear the u.s. economy pays attention to what washington is doing but this is an unpredictable business and makes it interesting but it makes it hard to know sort of what washington does in the next week, months, or year. what that means for sort of how much the economy can recover and at what rate. >> reporter: while there may be political uncertainty, for the time being, there is only good news for those like recent college grad eddie christian who just landed his first job. >> i look at this as sort of a career, not just a
is confident about its security and a lot of the old barriers to commerce and educational exchange and all that has begun to break down, that's something that the young people of gaza are going to want. and the pressure that will be placed for the residents of gaza to experience that same future is something that is going to be i think overwhelmingly appealing. but that is probably going to take place during the course of some sort of transition period. and the security requirements that israel requires will have to be met. and i think that is able -- that we can accomplish that, but ultimately it's going to be something that requires everybody to stretch out of their comfort zones. and the one thing i will say to the people of israel is that you can be assured whoever is in the office i currently occupy, democrat or republican, that your security will be uppermost on our minds. that will not change. and that should not mean you let up on your vigilance in terms of wanting to look out for your own country. it does -- it should give you some comfort, though, that you have the most powerful
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